George Atkinson

--/--/1878 - 17/04/1918

  • Forenames: George
  • Surname: Atkinson
  • Date of Birth: --/--/1878
  • Place of Birth: Burghwallis
  • Father: William Atkinson
  • Mother: Sarah Ann Atkinson
  • Date of Marriage: 14/10/1908
  • Spouse: Susannah Atack
  • Date of Death: 17/04/1918
  • Age: 40
  • Cemetery: Tyne Cot Cemetery
  • Rank: Private
  • Service Type: Army
  • Battalion: 20th Company Labour Corps
  • Regiment: K.O.Y.L.I. Labour Corps
  • Service Number: 33173, 11440
  • Service Record: Remembered with honour at the Tyne Cot Cemetery
  • Census Years: 1881, 1891, 1901, 1911

Remembered with honour at the Tyne Cot Cemetery

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George Atkinson

George Atkinson lived with his family in Burghwallis. George worked on the Burghwallis Hall estate as a coachman and gardener. In October 1908, George married Susannah Atack. To mark their marriage, Major Anne of the Hall gave George a silver tea set for a wedding present engraved “to G.A. from G.A.” as their initials were the same. During the First World War George served with the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry and later with the 20th Company of the Labour Corps. George died on 17 April 1918, aged 40, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

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Crathorne Edward Isham Charlton Anne

Crathorne Edward Isham Charlton Anne’s father, Ernest, was a retired Captain in the Army. The family had multiple residencies, but at the outbreak of war, Crathorne was living at Burghwallis Hall, Doncaster. Although Crathorne started his First World War military experience in the 6th battalion of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in September 1914, he transferred to the Royal Flying Corp (RFC)s and trained as a pilot. Crathorne undertook reconnaissance work over enemy lines, gathering information, until his plane experienced an engine failure and caused him to crash. He returned to England to recuperate and have an operation on his nose and after his recovery became the Chief Instructor of Military Aeronautics in Oxford. He was then posted as Chief Instructor at a school in Egypt. En route to take up this post on 15 April 1917, the ship he was travelling on, the H.M. Transport ship Arcadian, was sunk by a torpedo in the Aegean Sea. Crathorne immediately sprang into action to save his men but he went down with the ship. His Commandant, Colonel C. Saunders, D.S.O. described Crathorne as an ‘excellent instructor’ and a ‘splendid organizer’ with ‘brilliant and exceptional capabilities’. Crathorne had been married to his wife Annie Charlotte Ellen Miller for less than a year when he died. Crathorne is commemorated on the Mikra Memorial in Greece and also on the Burghwallis War Memorial.